Ohio Legislature Alters Law on Truancy and Student Discipline

The Ohio Legislature passed House Bill 410 (H.B. 410) last December after considering the legislation for over a year. The bill became law on April 6, 2017. As of April 6, school districts must measure absences in hours, rather than days, and must adhere to new laws regarding student discipline. The new law substantially changes the truancy law for the 2017-2018 school year, and requires school districts to prepare and implement policies that emphasize intervention strategies for chronically absent students. Significant changes have also been made with respect to student out-of-school suspensions. [More]

Ohio Legislature Alters Law on Truancy and Student Discipline

The Ohio Legislature passed House Bill 410 (H.B. 410) last December after considering the legislation for over a year. The bill became law on April 6, 2017. As of April 6, school districts must measure absences in hours, rather than days, and must adhere to new laws regarding student discipline. The new law substantially changes the truancy law for the 2017-2018 school year, and requires school districts to prepare and implement policies that emphasize intervention strategies for chronically absent students. Significant changes have also been made with respect to student out-of-school suspensions. [More]

New "Education Law Update" Podcast to Help School Districts Manage Emerging, Challenging Issues

To help school districts stay abreast of the latest court decisions and agency guidance and provide insights on best practices for handling today's most complex issues, Walter | Haverfield education law attorneys Miriam Pearlmutter and Lisa Woloszynek have launched "Education Law Update", a podcast series covering an array of timely issues. [More]

Airline Seats: Know Your (Limited) Rights

Social media exploded recently when a passenger aboard a United Airlines branded flight was forcibly removed from his seat by airport security, in part to make room for four airline employees who needed to be at the intended destination to crew another flight. (No doubt to the chagrin of United CEO Oscar Munoz because the fact that the flight was actually run by one of the airline's regional affiliates, Republic Airlines, was lost on the general public.) This raises the question: When you pay for your airline ticket, do you have a legal right to a seat on the airplane? [More]