Making America Recreate Again - Comp time may be a future option for private sector employers

Americans spend a lot of time at work. A recent study published by Bloomberg.com, in fact, suggests that the average American works almost 25 percent more hours than the average person in Europe. The raw numbers are about 258 more hours per year which averages out to about an hour more each week day. Comparing working life between countries in an apples-to-apples comparison can be tricky when considering the increasing frequency of remote work. Yet, most people would likely agree that Americans are putting in some real hours on the job. [More]

Will Chief Wahoo be around for another World Series? Latest related trademark battles could threaten longevity of controversial Indians icon

No one would argue that the Cleveland Indians had a great run this past season. Thanks to their qualifying for the World Series, images of Chief Wahoo deluged our television screens, our print media and our social media postings. Beneath the fanfare, however, are some very serious legal issues that could ultimately challenge the long-term use and value of the Indians icon. [More]

FEDERAL COURT RULES LOCAL GOVERNMENTS CAN RESTRICT UNIONS FROM CHARGING FEES

Just before Thanksgiving, in a unanimous decision the federal Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that local governments can enact right-to-work laws that will apply to private sector businesses and organizations whose labor relations are covered by the National Labor Relations Act ("NLRA"). Right-to-Work is shorthand for a law or ordinance that prohibits private sector collective bargaining agreements from making the payment of money to a labor union a condition of employment. The decision, United Autoworkers Union v. Hardin County, Ky., is now the law in Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan and Tennessee, the states that constitute the Sixth Circuit. Prior to Hardin, the NLRA was interpreted to reserve that right to the state government itself. Organized labor waged a furious, but ultimately futile campaign against the Hardin County law. [More]

The Sixth Circuit Steps into the Transgender Debate By Affirming The Highland Local Decision

The ongoing debate regarding the responsibilities of public school districts with respect to transgender students has continued to be fueled by a new decision from the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. On December 15, 2016, the Sixth Circuit issued an Order in Board of Education of Highland Local School District v. United States Department of Education, et al., affirming the decision of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio, which blocked that school district's attempt to prevent a transgender student identifying as a female from using the girls' restroom at her school. Both the lower court's decision and the Sixth Circuit decisions in Highland align with the U.S. Department of Education's ("DOE") interpretation of Title IX. Specifically, the DOE has provided that funding recipients must "generally treat transgender students consistent with their gender identity." [More]

Firearms Require Special Considerations in Estate Planning

Of all the unique assets that may be covered in the estate planning process, firearms perhaps present the most unique set of challenges and considerations. Owners of firearms need to make sure they disclose said ownership upfront in the planning process and seek counsel from an attorney who knows the right questions to ask. Important considerations include the type of firearm involved, its value, background on the beneficiary and location of the beneficiary. [More]