Protests Post-Parkland: The legal ramifications of the rising tide of school protests

Tragedy. Loss. Sorrow. Debate. Passion. Protest. The devastating school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida has spawned national (and often contentious) debates across the country. Students, school staff members, parents and community groups are front-and-center in this ongoing conversation and are voicing their concerns. As a result, school districts, post-Parkland, have witnessed a tidal wave of student and employee protests in and beyond the classroom. These protests vary in form, size and character. They range from local and national walkouts (such as National School Walkout Day and the March for Our Lives event), administrative office walk-ins, "die-ins," marches, rallies and social media campaigns to school-structured debates, moments of silence, clothing or insignia support campaigns, and student listening sessions. [More]

Decoding Ohio's New Truancy Law for Students with Disabilities

When Ohio updated its truancy law in 2017, the move required schools to emphasize prevention over punishment. Lawmakers shifted the focus from court proceedings to intervention strategies in schools, hoping students will return to the classroom and face a better chance for academic success. In the process, the juvenile justice system can reduce its caseload and focus on more serious matters. [More]

The U.S. Supreme Court and Transgender Students

In yet another development in the saga of transgender law in America's public schools, the United States Supreme Court put a halt to a trial court order that would have allowed a transgender male student to use the boy's restroom in a high school in Gloucester County, Virginia at the start of the upcoming school year. The Supreme Court blocked the trial court's order in a 5-3 decision, which will preserve the status quo at the high school until the Gloucester County School Board seeks the Supreme Court's review of the lower court's order later in August. While the high court's decision is a significant step in the transgender student's case, it does not have legal effect on any other cases. [More]