Wolfe co-chairs statewide environmental seminar for the Ohio State Bar Association

On March 30-31, 2017, Leslie G. Wolfe co-chaired the 32nd Annual Ohio Environment, Energy and Resources Law Seminar sponsored by the Ohio State Bar Association. The event was held at Nationwide Hotel & Conference Center in Lewis Center, Ohio and was attended by over 200 environmental attorneys and professional consultants. Highlights included a keynote address by Ohio EPA Director Craig Butler, as well as presentations by other speakers on timely environmental issues, including Professor Jonathan Adler of Case Western Reserve University School of Law. [More]

Attorney reviewing Elyria's employee classifications

In an article published on March 29, 2017 in the Elyria newspaper, The Chronicle-Telegram, Susan Anderson was recognized for her work on behalf of the City of Elyria. In this article, reporter Lisa Roberson noted that Susan has been working to determine which city employees should fall under nonexempt status and, consequently, are eligible to receive overtime payments. [More]

Marvinney Teaches Oral Advocacy Class at Case Western Reserve University School of Law

On March 27, 2017, Craig A. Marvinney, along with Supreme Court of Ohio Justice Sharon L. Kennedy, jointly taught a class on Oral Advocacy at Case Western Reserve University School of Law. This class, which was presented to the entire First Year Class and upper class Moot Court Co-Curricular students of CWRU, took place at the university's Tinkham Veale Student Center. Justice Kennedy spoke with a "View from the Bench," using excerpts from video footage of actual oral arguments to the Ohio Supreme Court. [More]

United States Supreme Court Creates New Standard for Provision of a Free Appropriate Public Education

On March 22, 2017, the United States Supreme Court, in the case of Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District RE-1, created a new standard for determining whether a student with a disability under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) has been provided with a free appropriate public education (FAPE). In Endrew F., the Court was asked to decide the degree of "educational benefit" a child must receive in order for the school district to have provided a FAPE. The lower court in Endrew F. used the "merely more than de minimus" standard that had been adopted by the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously rejected this standard and instead held that in order "to meet its substantive obligation under the IDEIA, a school must offer an IEP reasonably calculated to enable a child to make progress appropriate in light of the child's circumstances." Endrew F. ex rel. Joseph F. v. Douglas Cty. Sch. Dist. RE-1, No. 15-827, 2017 WL 1066260, at *1 (U.S. Mar. 22, 2017) (emphasis added). [More]